Lucille Robles

  • Nov 17, 2019 My grandmother, Lucille Robles, was born to Ramon Chavez & Elvira Lozano. Ramon was born in 1895 and joined the United States Army in 1918 to fight in the end of World War I. He met and married Elvira in 1927 and their marriage produced eight children. Like most families they struggled to get by. In fact, my grandmother was born in Mississippi because that’s where Ramon & Elvira happen to be picking cotton on a farm when she arrived. My grandmother Lucille would later tell stories how she would help pick cotton as a child with her younger siblings to help contribute to the workload. I think it was in those hot summer days with no shade in the cotton fields that my grandmother decided she wanted more out of life. I’d like to believe those Great Depression cotton fields fueled her drive and determination that she would later use to build a big and beautiful life for herself.

    At the young age of 18 years old, she got married in her hometown of Harlingen, Texas. That marriage produced three children, Johnny, Yolanda, and Raul. For the next 20 years, she worked multiple jobs to provide for her family and while working in a nursing home in Victoria, Texas she decided to apply to nursing school. She began classes at Victoria Junior College and was 1 of 4 Latin Americans to be selected for the school’s Licensed Vocational Nursing Program.

    After graduation she worked in a County Hospital in labor & deliver where she would spend the next eight years. She was making $175 month in 1968. So, when she heard Galveston hospitals were paying $400 a month, she applied, accepted their offer, and moved. This move came with a lot of life changes. She divorced her first husband, got settled in a new job in a new city, and met & married the love of her life, Ernest. Their marriage would produce their only child together, Ernie.

    She was a nurse for over 60 years total with 47 years of those at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Galveston, specializing in their acute burn unit and teaching the incoming nurses. And although she was a highly accomplished and a well-respected nurse in that hospital, her real pride and joy in life was her family. At the time of her death at age 91, her 4 children graced her with 14 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren, and 11 great-great grandchildren.

    When she wasn’t spending time with her family, she was volunteering at the hospital, singing in the choir, and lending a helping hand at the church. My grandmother didn’t know how to be idle. And even in her last days in the hospital as I begged for her to eat just a little bit more of her lunch she asked me to help her stand up. Even in her weak state, her mind wouldn’t tell her body to rest. I’ll miss that the most. Her fierce independent, strong-willed, never stop nature about her. What an amazing role model to have. What an exceptional woman to share genes with. That never quit blood runs through me and I will proudly carry it while I miss her tremendously.
    Erika Perez Mack
  • Nov 17, 2019 My grandmother, Lucille Robles, was born to Ramon Chavez & Elvira Lozano. Ramon was born in 1895 and joined the United States Army in 1918 to fight in the end of World War I. He met and married Elvira in 1927 and their marriage produced eight children. Like most families they struggled to get by. In fact, my grandmother was born in Mississippi because that’s where Ramon & Elvira happen to be picking cotton on a farm when she arrived. My grandmother Lucille would later tell stories how she would help pick cotton as a child with her younger siblings to help contribute to the workload. I think it was in those hot summer days with no shade in the cotton fields that my grandmother decided she wanted more out of life. I’d like to believe those Great Depression cotton fields fueled her drive and determination that she would later use to build a big and beautiful life for herself.

    At the young age of 18 years old, she got married in her hometown of Harlingen, Texas. That marriage produced three children, Johnny, Yolanda, and Raul. For the next 20 years, she worked multiple jobs to provide for her family and while working in a nursing home in Victoria, Texas she decided to apply to nursing school. She began classes at Victoria Junior College and was 1 of 4 Latin Americans to be selected for the school’s Licensed Vocational Nursing Program.

    After graduation she worked in a County Hospital in labor & deliver where she would spend the next eight years. She was making $175 month in 1968. So, when she heard Galveston hospitals were paying $400 a month, she applied, accepted their offer, and moved. This move came with a lot of life changes. She divorced her first husband, got settled in a new job in a new city, and met & married the love of her life, Ernest. Their marriage would produce their only child together, Ernie.

    She was a nurse for over 60 years total with 47 years of those at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Galveston, specializing in their acute burn unit and teaching the incoming nurses. And although she was a highly accomplished and a well-respected nurse in that hospital, her real pride and joy in life was her family. At the time of her death at age 91, her 4 children graced her with 14 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren, and 11 great-great grandchildren.

    When she wasn’t spending time with her family, she was volunteering at the hospital, singing in the choir, and lending a helping hand at the church. My grandmother didn’t know how to be idle. And even in her last days in the hospital as I begged for her to eat just a little bit more of her lunch she asked me to help her stand up. Even in her weak state, her mind wouldn’t tell her body to rest. I’ll miss that the most. Her fierce independent, strong-willed, never stop nature about her. What an amazing role model to have. What an exceptional woman to share genes with. That never quit blood runs through me and I will proudly carry it while I miss her tremendously.
    Erika Perez Mack
  • Nov 16, 2019 I will miss my Grandma so much. She was strong willed with an amazing work ethic. We all loved her Mexican rice, tamales, and enchiladas. I am thankful she taught me how to cook them but they will never be as good as hers. I am glad she is celebrating in heaven with Grandpa. Love you! Charmel Rodick